Service of thanksgiving held as Jean Patterson passes away

Jean Patterson (third from right in third row) pictured with members of Railway Street Presbyterian Church Choir in new robes in 1969.  Included are Joe McKibben (Sexton), Rev Jim Briggs (Assistant Minister), Stanley Woods (Choirmaster) and Rev Howard Cromie (Minister).
Jean Patterson (third from right in third row) pictured with members of Railway Street Presbyterian Church Choir in new robes in 1969. Included are Joe McKibben (Sexton), Rev Jim Briggs (Assistant Minister), Stanley Woods (Choirmaster) and Rev Howard Cromie (Minister).

A Service of Thanksgiving for the life of Jane Elizabeth (Jean) Patterson was held in Railway Street Presbyterian Church on Sunday November 27.

The service was conducted by the minister, the Rev Michael Davidson with Scripture readings by Dr Charles Patterson and Dr Andrew Patterson.

Jean Patterson.

Jean Patterson.

Dr Bertha Cowan presided at the organ and together with a choir formed especially for the service, led the singing of the hymns, ‘Thine be the glory’, ‘In Christ alone’ and ‘Rock of ages

Jean was born on the 29th of July 1926 to parents Smyth and Mary Patterson. She was brought up initially at Ballyhomra, between Legacurry and Hillsborough. Her father built his own farmhouse, still known today as Homra House, where she enjoyed her childhood along with her younger siblings Maureen, Harold and Hubert. The family attended Annahilt Presbyterian Church. She enjoyed telling how her father walked them to Sunday School every week.

Her father was a business man who along with farming exported hay, straw, and potatoes to England and Cyprus. He also opened a shop in Lisburn selling supplies to farmers and builders.

Although Jean would have liked to be a school teacher, she was needed in the business, so she duly made her career in the office at Smyth Patterson. She was known for her precise and meticulous attention to detail. If there was a penny out in the day’s takings, no one got home until it was found. By this time Smyth had moved the family to Danescroft, a farm at Duneight. Unfortunately, he became ill and died a short time later. He was only 51. The decision was taken to sell the farm and concentrate on the shop. Hence they moved to Clonevin Park in Lisburn.

By this time the Patterson’s had joined Railway Street Presbyterian Church and before long Jean got involved as a Sunday School teacher and member of the choir, loyally serving in both for several decades. She also began helping with the Life Boys, ending up leading the Railway Street group. Recently she was delighted when the Rev Michael Davidson along with other members of Railway Street visited Nicholson House Nursing home where she was staying.

For many years Jean strived to live a pure and natural life in body, mind and spirit, eating organic vegetarian food and drinking spring water. She rarely took any medication and it was only recently she was persuaded to take some paracetamol for pain relief. Jean was blessed with clarity of mind in her elderly years and she had a great interest in news and current affairs

She will be sadly missed by her family and friends.