Protecting Lisburn’s historic buildings

The Cardan is celebrating its 10th birthday as well as Lisburn Restaurant Week. They'll be holding a special party for all their customers.
The Cardan is celebrating its 10th birthday as well as Lisburn Restaurant Week. They'll be holding a special party for all their customers.

In what has been hailed a boost for the city, nine Lisburn buildings, between them spanning more than 300 years, have been newly listed.

The news from Environment Minister Mark H Durkan brings to 450 the total number of listed buildings in the Lisburn and Castlereagh City Council area.

Dating to the early 18th century, three of the new listings - early Georgian townhouses at 41-43, 49 and 51 Market Square - are among the city centre’s oldest known buildings.

Likewise listed is 41 Railway St/2 Bachelor’s Walk, constructed in 1848 as the Railway Hotel, a purpose it served until the mid-20th century, when it became a bar and restaurant.

At Bridge Street the late 18th century building at Number 19 has also been listed. “This is a boost for Lisburn City and the surrounding area,” said Mr Durkan. “Behind the doors of each of these landmarks is a fascinating insight into the roots of this city.

“Spanning over three centuries they are at the very core of its rich culture and history.

“Listing these structures will ensure that these important cultural assets are preserved and protected for now and future generations.”

Outside Lisburn City there are three new listings from Brookhill Demesne estate, which is over 300 years old. The main house has long since been demolished, but a Tudor revival tower and a Chinese-inspired roof on the north-east gate of the farmyard, alongside other historically significant garden features, will be protected.

Also listed, at Ballylesson Road, is ‘Denmoy’, a Victorian house used as a dispensary during the second half of the 19th century.

Meanwhile, having been twice relocated and no longer meeting requirements, the Crimean cannon in Castle Gardens has been de-listed.